Kaspersky Endpoint Security 11 for Windows

Glossary

February 14, 2024

ID 90

Active key

A key that is currently used by the application.

Additional key

A key that certifies the right to use the application but is not currently being used.

Administration group

A set of devices that share common functions and a set of Kaspersky applications installed on them. Devices are grouped so that they can be managed conveniently as a single unit. A group may include other groups. It is possible to create group policies and group tasks for each installed application in the group.

Anti-virus databases

Databases that contain information about computer security threats known to Kaspersky as of the anti-virus database release date. Anti-virus database signatures help to detect malicious code in scanned objects. Anti-virus databases are created by Kaspersky specialists and updated hourly.

Archive

One or several files packed into a single compressed file. A specialized application called an archiver is required for packing and unpacking data.

Authentication Agent

Interface that lets you complete authentication to access encrypted hard drives and load the operating system after the bootable hard drive has been encrypted.

Certificate issuer

Certification center that issued the certificate.

Database of malicious web addresses

A list of web addresses whose content may be considered to be dangerous. The list is created by Kaspersky specialists. It is regularly updated and is included in the Kaspersky application distribution kit.

Database of phishing web addresses

A list of web addresses which Kaspersky specialists have determined to be phishing-related. The database is regularly updated and is part of the Kaspersky application distribution kit.

Disinfection

A method of processing infected objects that results in complete or partial recovery of data. Not all infected objects can be disinfected.

False alarm

A false alarm occurs when the Kaspersky application reports an uninfected file as infected because the signature of the file is similar to that of a virus.

Infectable file

A file which, due to its structure or format, can be used by intruders as a "container" to store and spread malicious code. As a rule, these are executable files, with such file extensions as .com, .exe, and .dll. There is a fairly high risk of intrusion of malicious code in such files.

Infected file

A file which contains malicious code (code of known malware has been detected when scanning the file). Kaspersky does not recommend using such files, because they may infect your computer.

IOC

Indicator of Compromise. A set of data about a malicious object or activity.

IOC file

A file containing a set of indicators of compromise (IOCs) that the application tries to match to count a detection. The likelihood of detection can be higher if exact matches with multiple IOC files are found for the object as a result of the scan.

License certificate

A document that Kaspersky transfers to the user together with the key file or activation code. It contains information about the license granted to the user.

Mask

Representation of a file name and extension by using wildcards.

File masks can contain any characters that are allowed in file names, including wildcards:

  • The * (asterisk) character, which takes the place of any set of characters, except the \ and / characters (delimiters of the names of files and folders in paths to files and folders). For example, the mask C:\*\*.txt will include all paths to files with the TXT extension located in folders on the C: drive, but not in subfolders.
  • Two consecutive * characters take the place of any set of characters (including an empty set) in the file or folder name, including the \ and / characters (delimiters of the names of files and folders in paths to files and folders). For example, the mask C:\Folder\**\*.txt will include all paths to files with the TXT extension located in folders nested within the Folder, except the Folder itself. The mask must include at least one nesting level. The mask C:\**\*.txt is not a valid mask. The ** mask is available only for creating scan exclusions.
  • The ? (question mark) character, which takes the place of any single character, except the \ and / characters (delimiters of the names of files and folders in paths to files and folders). For example, the mask C:\Folder\???.txt will include paths to all files residing in the folder named Folder that have the TXT extension and a name consisting of three characters.
Network Agent

A Kaspersky Security Center component that enables interaction between the Administration Server and Kaspersky applications that are installed on a specific network node (workstation or server). This component is common for all Kaspersky applications running under Windows. Dedicated versions of Network Agent are intended for applications running under other operating systems.

Normalized form of the address of a web resource

The normalized form of the address of a web resource is a textual representation of a web resource address that is obtained through normalization. Normalization is a process whereby the textual representation of a web resource address changes according to specific rules (for example, exclusion of the user login, password, and connection port from the text representation of the web resource address; additionally, the web resource address is changed from uppercase to lowercase characters).

Regarding the operation of protection components, the purpose of normalization of web resource addresses is to avoid scanning website addresses, which may differ in syntax while being physically equivalent, more than once.

Example:

Non-normalized form of an address: www.Example.com\.

Normalized form of an address: www.example.com.

 

OLE object

An attached file or a file that is embedded in another file. Kaspersky applications allow scanning OLE objects for viruses. For example, if you insert a Microsoft Office Excel table into a Microsoft Office Word document, the table is scanned as an OLE object.

OpenIOC

Open standard of Indicator of Compromise (IOC) descriptions based on XML and including over 500 different Indicators of Compromise.

Portable File Manager

This is an application that provides an interface for working with encrypted files on removable drives when encryption functionality is not available on the computer.

Protection scope

Objects that are constantly being scanned by the Essential Threat Protection component when it is running. The protection scopes of different components have different properties.

Scan scope

Objects that Kaspersky Endpoint Security scans while performing a scan task.

Task

Functions performed by the Kaspersky application as tasks, for example: Real-time File Protection, Full Device Scan, Database Update.

Trusted Platform Module

A microchip developed to provide basic functions related to security (for example, for storing encryption keys). A Trusted Platform Module is usually installed on the computer motherboard and interacts with all other system components via the hardware bus.

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